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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 107 (some duplicates have been removed)
history of debt in the u.s.; and h.i.v. infections in young people. but first, the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street lost ground today over renewed concerns that deficit talks in washington are not making progress. the dow jones industrial average was down 89 points to close at 12,878. the nasdaq fell nine points to close below 2968. earlier, there were more signs of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i thin
charges and aees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and b
: just finally quickly, evidence of a u.s. role there? >> i spoke to a u.s. official today about that. it's interesting. the u.s. role from what we hear is essential to offer words of encouragement to both sides. they keep stressing that egypt is really leading this and that they don't need this sort of push that one would expect. that said, there's a frustration in congress by the comments that hamid morsi, the president, made here in support of hamas. lindsey gham came out on sunday and said that congress was watching it very closely. the u.s. says that egypt is taking the initiative on its own, that the u.s. role is ancillary, that the u.s. is monitoring it. president obama has spoken to morsi. as recently as today. hillary clinton has spoken to her counterpart and the prime minister here that the u.s. does have a role. but that egypt is willingly leading the peace negotiations. >> woodruff: nancy yousef, on the story in cairo. nancy yousef with mcclatchy, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> woodruff: oline we have a first person account from journalist stephanie freid, who writes ab
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: general john allen, the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, is under investigation for sending messages to a woman linked to the scandal that forced c.i.a. director petraus to resign. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on what were termed "potentially inappropriate" e- mails and documents, and we examine if and when the white house and congress should have been alerted. >> ifill: then, the senate and the house of representatives get back to work. judy woodruff looks at the long list of challenges ahead. >> brown: one item on the agenda is the so-called fiscal cliff , and that was the focus of a white house meeting today with liberal leaders. we talk with two participants. >> ifill: plus, from "our food for nine billion" series, special correspondent mary kay magistad reports on china's moves to satisfy a growing demand for meat. it has transformed lives and diets over the past 30 years meat con suption per cap to has quadrupled and city dwellers e
of political solution? and what will the u.s. role be. >> i disagree with a lot of things that was said now. but one thing i very strongly agree. there is no political solution. and there can to the be a political solution because what you have in gaza is an organization dedicated it to the destruction of israel, dedicated to killing of jews. this is what they say openly. i mean this is not an interpretation of what they're saying. this is what they're saying. as long as the threat exists they will fight israel. they are committed to an anti-sellity-- anti-semitic of killing juice jews, it's in their charter n their document t is what they are openly saying. they are not leave israel alone regard will of what is happening. so once israel withdraws totally from the gaza strip they started shelling israeli cities. and i also agree that whatever israel can achieve, and it can achieve quite a lot. it achieved four years of tranquillity, relative tranquillity. but only can achieve relative tranquillity for a while and then it will come up again because the hamas is committed to the destruction o
, a longtime u.s. diplomat and mideast envoy, serving in the george h.w. bush, clinton, and obama administrations. he's now a counselor at the washington institute for near east policy. and khaled elgindy, a palestinian participant in the 2007 annapolis peace negotiations, and now a fellow at the saban center for middle east policy at the brookings institution. i want to start with you. your reading on where things stand tonight in termed of a pause or cease-fire. >> i do think the outlines of the cease-fire have probably been shapedded at this point. i think the secretary of state is there and has a chance to finalize this by, in a sense, becoming the, i think, the repository of the commitments that each side has made. i think one of the things that's going on right now is trying to make certain that all the understandings are understood the same way by each side and whatever promises are being made will now be promises made to her as well. in effect she becomes almost the holder of those as a kind of deposit. that, i think, is a chance for the cease-fire to actually be implement
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
decades and teaches at the u.s. naval academy. and sari horwitz is an investigative reporter at the "washington post." sari, we have watchedded shoes dropping on this all weekend. what new have we learned today? >> hi, gwen. we're now learning a little bit more about how this investigation started and more of what the f.b.i. found. i mean there have been a lot of questions of why does the f.b.i. do an investigation into harassing emails? i mean lots of people get harassing emails. i get harassing emails but what we found today was that this woman jo kelly who was a friend of the petraeus family, and she lived in tampa, she actually knew an f.b.i. agent and mentioned to him that in june she mentioned to him that she had been receiving these very sort of troubling, strange, bizarre accusatory emails. and gave them to him. he started the investigation. that's how it began in june. and... >> ifill: as we watch this time line unfold, sari, we can't help but ask who knew what when? for instance, we gather that the justice department, the f.b.i. knew about this some time ago. but th
on the "newshour": the economic troubles in greece; the shopping frenzy in the u.s. a day early; the lives of native americans and the demand for meat in china. but first, the other news of the day. in syria, rebel fighters gained more momentum in the east today. they seized a key army base at mayadeen and took control of its artillery stockpiles. to the north, syrian government warplanes flattened a building next to a hospital in aleppo overnight. at least 15 people were killed. the airstrikes damaged e of the last remaining sources of medical aid for civilians there. a taliban suicide bomber killed 23 people in a procession of shi-ite muslims in pakistan. the attack happened near midnight when the bomber tried to join a religious gathering in rawalpindi. at least 62 people were wounded, including six policemen. this is the latest in a string of bombings targeting shi-ites during their holiest month of the year. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. defended her first account of the attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice has come under fire by critics who say she gave misleading
, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows to present the administration's position. >> sreenivasan: collins stopped short of joining other republican senators who have said they will oppose rice if she is nominated to be secretary of state. later, president obama again defended rice. he called her extraordinary, and cabinet members joined him in applause. a pair of suicide car bombers in syria blew themselves up today in a suburb of damascus. at least 34 people were killed. the twin explosions shattered buildings and left streets littered with rubble. in addition to the dead, the stat
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really unsettling becauswe d't he por. we don't know what's going on. we don't have anywhere to get to televisions. >> woodruff: many people flocked to mobile charging stations across the city. plugging in cell phones and other devices. but today brought some sign of things
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 107 (some duplicates have been removed)